How does Nidol work?

Nidol
Uses: menstrual pain, acute pain

How does Nidol work?
Nidol is a product that contains nimesulide. Nimesulide is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain reliever (NSAID) that works by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins, thereby reducing pain.

Therefore, Nidol can be used to relieve various acute pain conditions and menstrual pain.

How to use Nidol and adjust dosage?
Common dosage forms of Nidol are tablets and sachets, which are only suitable for people over twelve years of age. The usual dose is 50-100 mg per day.

What are the side effects of Nidol?
Common side effects of Nidol are indigestion, nausea, and bleeding stomach ulcers. Long-term use can cause kidney or liver damage and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Who should not use the brand name Nidol:
Those who are allergic to any of the ingredients of their preparations.
People who have allergic reactions after taking aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain relievers. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if symptoms such as hives, facial redness, or heart palpitations occur after taking this medicine.
People with heart failure or high blood pressure.
People with gastrointestinal bleeding or gastrointestinal ulcers.

Pharmacist Tip:
Do not use more than one product containing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain relievers at the same time.
When taking the powder, stir thoroughly and ensure that the powder is completely dissolved in the water.

Common taking time:
Nidol can be taken on an empty or full stomach. Take with food to avoid indigestion or stomach irritation.


The information is for reference only, and the actual medication time will be adjusted according to individual circumstances.

Common possible conflicting drugs:

Lithium
Cyclosporin
Methotrexate
Other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain relievers such as Aspirin, Diclofenac
Diuretics such as Furosemide, Hydrochlorothiazide
Antidepressants such as Fluoxetine, Paroxetine

If you are taking the above medicines, please inform your doctor or pharmacist, the dosage may need to be adjusted.

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