How does Tacrolimus work?

Tacrolimus

How does Tacrolimus work?
Tacrolimus is an immunosuppressant that inhibits calcineurin, thereby inhibiting cytokine release and production. This reduces the activity of T lymphocytes, which in turn reduces the activity of the immune system. Tacrolimus is used to prevent and treat organ transplant rejection and to treat eczema.

How to use Tacrolimus and adjust dosage?
Tacrolimus can be administered topically as an ointment or orally as capsules and sustained-action capsules. Administration with or without food is also possible, but if gastrointestinal intolerance occurs, it is administered with food. Sustained-action capsules should not be opened, chewed, or crushed. Its uses and dosages are listed below.

Moderate to severe atopic dermatitis
Children over two years old, adults and seniors
Ointment: Apply only a thin layer to the affected area twice a day until symptoms resolve or after six weeks. Reassess the condition at that time.

Liver transplant
Adults and seniors
Quick-Acting Capsules: 0.1-0.15 mg/kg daily in two divided doses, every twelve hours, with corticosteroids.
Sustained Action Capsules: 0.1-0.2 mg/kg once daily with corticosteroids within twelve to eighteen hours post-transplant.

Heart Transplant
Adults and seniors
Fast-Acting Capsules: 0.075 mg/kg daily in two divided doses every twelve hours, with antimetabolites or mTOR kinase.

Kidney transplant
Adults and seniors
Quick-Acting Capsules: 0.2 mg/kg per day, taken in two divided doses every 12 hours, together with azathioprine or mycophenolate mofetil.
Sustained Action Capsules:
After induction with basiliximab: 0.15-0.2 mg/kg once daily.
After induction without basiliximab: 0.1 mg/kg once within 12 hours before surgery; 0.2 mg/kg once daily after surgery.

What are the side effects of Tacrolimus?
Common side effects of tacrolimus include cardiopulmonary failure, fibrillation, hair loss, bladder spasms, leukopenia, and blurred vision.

Who should not use Tacrolimus?
Those who are allergic to tacrolimus, polyoxyethylene 60 hydrogenated castor oil (HCO-60), or any ingredient in their formulations

Pharmacist Tip:
Rub gently and thoroughly to apply the ointment, applying only to the affected area.
Do not obscure the applied area.
Discontinue use when symptoms disappear.
Wash hands before and after use.
Administration with or without food is also possible, but if gastrointestinal intolerance occurs, it is administered with food.
Sustained-action capsules should not be opened, chewed, or crushed.

Common taking time:
Oral tacrolimus is taken twice a day, for example, in the morning and evening.
Tacrolimus ointment is applied in a thin layer twice a day, for example in the morning and evening after a bath.

The information is for reference only, and the actual medication time will be adjusted according to individual circumstances.

Common possible conflicting drugs:
Immunosuppressants such as Tacrolimus, Mycophenolate, Sirolimus
Statins such as Simvastatin, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin
Aminoglycosides such as Vancomycin, Amikacin, Tobramycin
Antidiabetic drugs such as Metformin, Sitagliptin, Gliclazide
QT prolongers such as Amiodarone, Dronedarone, Amisulpride

Tacrolimus may interact with many drugs. If you are taking the above medicines, please inform your doctor or pharmacist, the dosage may need to be adjusted.

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